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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make the same mistake again, america. that's why it had to come out before the election. it's a book about racism, and to my critics chagrin, i'm against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it, and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70s and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next case, treated in the media, suddenly the clan took over the new york city police force apparently. one of my -- it's hard to describe the beginnings because there's the brawl and various race hoaxes, and much like the trayvon martin case, they disappeared once the facts came out. you never get that final article saying, attention, readers, that story we've been his hysterica
with the actual history of civil rights in america. and it was great because they believe everything the new york times believes. at least the girls on the view would argue with me. one sentence summary of my book, and don't make the same mistake america. liberals have been the primary practitioners 7. every police shooting, suddenly the klan had taken of the new york city police force. like the trade on martin case, they disappear once the facts come out. the story we were hysterical about, you would know -- the black kid was -- did ambush and killing a cop, only because the stories would disappear from the news. one of the best ones was michael stewart who came to be called an artist because he was caught spraying graffiti in the subway. a dozen cops, they got him to the hospital two weeks later and he passed out and the revived demand and he was at a coma and died of pneumonia. he died as a result of police brutality despite medical examiner's saying the opposite. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter. they are acquitted and the new york times editorial the next day was remembering michae
of mississippi," the book previous to this, a study of the civil rights south and integration of james meredith at the university of ol miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot on like to pick out these subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to our cultural history, biography. >> paul hendrickson's most recent work, hemingway's bonet is the name of the book. thank you for joining us on booktv. >> thank you for having me. >> sander and stuart taylor talk about affirmative action, oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas. they agreed with the initial goals of affirmative action. that now believe it hurts the minorities. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you very much. thank you for roger and cato for sponsoring this event, it is great to have such a great kickoff to the book which is being officially published today. i am going to start and talk a little bit about the central idea itself and some of what we found in the book. i will try to relate this more to what is happening tomorrow. i am particularly glad to be doing this at cato because it stood for
're eligible. >> when we come back, myrna, you said there's going to be a civil rights rain of fire to protect voters. i'm interested in what that might look like. more on voter empowerment in this week in voter suppression when we come back. the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin care since...olay. cc for yourself. [ female announcer ] and challenge what's possible with olay total effects cc cream. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. there's a pop. wahlalalalallala! pepper, but not pepper, i'm getting like, pep-pepper. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, zip zip zip zip zip! i'm literally getting zinged by the flavor. smooth, but crisp. velvety. kind of makes me feel like a dah zing yah woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the ind
festivals and parades. news say they don't want their civil rights stripped away. >>> here at 7:00 yesterday you talked with us a little bit about dropping temperatures here at home and boy we could feel them today. >> yeah. some big difference, right? some areas as much as ten greece cooler this afternoon but we saw the sunshine in the afternoon, at least most of us did. the low clouds and the fog already moving back in, in fact, it's a little tough to see along highway one in some cases. down in pacifica you may find this or that to be aware of if you're going to be out and about. 61 san ra fell. widespread mid 60s at this time. look at the satellite radar. we're watching this system here that is going to bring us some rain and it looks like in time for some of our trick or treeth tomorrow night. you can see the northwest corner of california seeing just a few light sprinkles at this time. let's talk about what's here at home. we are dealing with just partly cloudy skies, a little bit of fog at the coast tomorrow morning we're going to wake up with the low clouds and fog once again but now
-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
for equal opportunity. he focuses on legal issues arising from civil rights laws including the regulatory impact on business and the problems in higher education created by affirmative action. a former deputy assistant attorney general and of ronald reagan and bush of administrations, he held the second highest positions in both the civil rights division and the environment and natural resources division. he has held several other positions in the justice department including the assistant to the solicitor general, associate deputy attorney general, and acting assistant attorney general in the office of legal policy degette ki is a graduate of yale law school. please welcome roger. [applause] >> thank you very much for that nice introduction and for inviting me today. thank you to the cato institute and rick and stuart writing this wonderful book. i am going to begin by keeping praise on rick and stuart for this book to be it's terrific. it makes an extraordinary contribution to the debate on these issues. i think it's unprecedented my contribution in many ways. i've read the book, and it
as a criminal prosecutor, a civil rights attorney, founder of a small business, and volunteered as chair of both the neighborhood association and an affordable housing organization. when i was elected four years ago, i promised to bring people together to deliver results, to increase cooperation and accountability at city hall. over the past four years, i'm proud of what we have=hvj÷ accomplishedpj9n together, focug on what matters, to deliver for our dim0]czdñ 3 neighborhoods, again and again. now, we've been creating jobsm with waterfront projects to open the new exploratorium, cruise ship terminal, america's campus, a chinese hospital. we're been keeping families in our city by rebuilding the recreation center, playgrounds all over the district, we've been supporting small businesses, cutting small business fees, red tape, and championing business tax reform on the november ballot. when proposition e passes so that we end our tax on jobs rather than on profits, our local merchants, our restaurants, cafes and shops will be able to hire more people. we've been building affordable housing for
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
and state civil rights laws. >> mr. sanchez. >> scott sanchez, the giants have won and congratulations to them on game 169 world series. [ applause ] >> i think that is the only applause i have gotten here. i hope i don't make it more difficult to understand for the commission. just going through the fact there was a v. from 1991-92 that authorized the garage at the rear. a one-car garage and it was issued and i don't think a building permit was filed. i think it was a previous owner of the building, but that was never invoked. i just happened to find that out today dooing additional research. so the process that we're in now began in 2005. when a variance application was filed in march to allow the garage at the rear. a building permit was filed in june of that year, section 311 neighborhood notify case was done on the garage and building permit. there was no discretionary review filed on that application. there was a hearing and the zoning administrator granted the variance and that was dated november of 2005, seven years ago. almost to the date. the building permit was subsequentl
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
, congressmen, hip hop and gospel artists as well as civil rights activists have come together over the past few hours to get voters to the polls. just a short time ago i talked to a number of folks who have gathered here, nine days before election day. i asked them why they think this thing is going to be so close. >> i think the election here in florida is going to be one of these bush-gore deals. i look for it to be -- >> you're thinking recount? >> i don't know about recount, but -- >> we hope it's about more than 537. >> yes, yes. >> thank you. >> we'll get back to politics in a moment. right now, though, we turn to the latest on hurricane sandy and for that, we've got it all covered here. nbc meteorologist dylan dreyer with the forecast and white house correspondent mike viquiera standing by with the latest on the president who just got a briefing at fema headquarters. and nbc's thanh truong is on the beach in rehoboth, did he dext let's start with dylan dreyer with the latest advisory from the national hurricane center. what can you tell us? >> we do still have to deal with a category 1 h
these issues, we're integrated. it's all integrated. it's economic, it's social, it's our civil rights. i think women take a different view. as sandra was saying, though, there is that gap between married women and what i prefer to say as unmarried women other than single women. some of us are a little older and not married. there's 52 million unmarried women. they break overwhelmingly for president obama. so i do think that in these broader numbers, some of those distinctions get lost and most important group for president obama, black women voted for him. >> right, who are the single largest group in terms of turnout in 2008. victoria, i was wondering a little bit about this idea of what does it take to create a multi-racial cross class, close enter generational women's coalition? on the one hand, we're not all the same. having ovaries or at one point having ovaries, not even get spoog the biology of it all. but that alone doesn't give you shared political interests, but it is sometimes surprising to see how different those opinions are depending on what sort of woman we're talking about. >>
're a statewide education civil rights organization, i was in san diego unified school district. so, you could see the budget cuts year and year rippling through our schools and our classrooms. and so, what's really at stake when we think about the future is not just our education system, not just our k-12 system, but the economy of our state and our state's future. what proposition 38 does is it reinvests in our k-12 system, our preschool system, for 12 years. on an average, $10 billion a year, and that would actually restore all the cuts that have been slashing through our education system for the last five years. now, that money is protected. it can't be taken by sacramento, it can't be used for other purposes. it has to go to schools. and then it gives films at the school level the ability to make decisions about how to use that money. so, not folks in sacramento, not administrators in districts but folks at the school level. and that's $10 billion a year that can be used to restore arts, music, p.e., extend the school year, all of the things that have been cut from our schools and school dist
out of that civil rights movement era. she was talking about that no tired message. we can stand in those lines. you give us one day, we'll at that time one day. you give us voter i.d., we'll get an i.d. and i think that message is important. >> thank you to joy reid. and up next, i'll bring my panel back in on this issue of voter suppression and the backlash against it. could it turn out that the republicans have been their own great undoing. er ] take dayquil... [ ding! ] ...and spend time on the slopes. take alka-seltzer plus cold & cough... [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [
, but a civil right. i will now turn the program over to our program administrator, ken stein. >> thank you very much, wendy. last month we had a program, swords to plowshares. today we will be hearing from marc trotz and dr. rag parekh. i want to thank dr. parekh, our first presenter who serves on the front lines of the most difficult to serve clients in the hardest economic times on a daily basis which, it me, is an incredible -- it's astounding what you and ran parker and your team do is remarkable. i also really want to thank marc trotz for coming today. some of you know he's going to be leaving the city at the end of the month and with his travel schedule this month and the fact he's leaving in a few weeks, the fact he took time to come and be with us today is great. i think it speaks super for transition that margo antonetti, is here today, we're delighted he's going to be here. a couple years ago i had the great, great pleasure of taking a tour of one of the city's supportive programs led by marc and it was an hour and a half tour. we don't have that much time today but i was most
in their business department. i was very active in the civil rights movement in new orleans. i moved to san francisco in 1980 with my wife cheryl and our son scott because i bought a seat on the pacific stock exchange in order to trade options for my own account. i did that successfully until 1980 at which time i became an arbitrator for finish ra, the financial industry regulatory authority. i'm still an arbitrator for finra. i also taught as an adjunct professor at usf. i taught real estate in their finance department. when i stopped trading i became more deeply involved in that district. i was elected to the st. stevens school board and was also appointed to the board of directors at the stones town ymca. i coached youth sports at the y and i also fund raised for both organizations. later fund raised for sacred heart where my son went to school and st. ignatius where my daughter went to school. my son is in the police department and my daughter works in the tech industry. my wife and i are very proud of both of them. i served on my homeowners association as delegate to the western twin p
is being followed. >> reporter: the office of civil rights in d.c., told us they respond to complaints. but no one is enforcing title ix regularly. a spokesman said they do conduct proactive investigation. but they haven't done any in the last four years. of the more than 200 e-mails we sent, a few did identify the title ix coordinator. but the majority did not respond or didn't know who it was. >> if you have a tip for jenna or anyone on our investigative unit, give us an e-mail or call. >>> a northern california surfer is recovering from emergency surgery tonight after another shark attack. it's the second in nearly a week along the california coast. the second one happened near eureka. you see the bites taken out of that surfboard. two of his friends, one happened to be an emt. both of them used their body weight to stop the victim's bleeding until the paramedics were able to arrive. >> he was gashed up in four or five serious gashes from the nipple down to his hip. he was bleeding out pretty good. >> the victim is reportedly in fair condition. a week ago, a 39-year-old surfer was k
measures. molly munger, the civil rights attorney who have almost completely financed prop 38, that looks like it's going to fail on election day and her brother charles, they both got their money from their dad who is warren buffett's business partner. charlie munger, who operates in republican politics, has been financing this paycheck deduction measure and financing the anti-jerry brown tax measure, though he apparently didn't think he was. that's another story. and yet tom, the hedge fund manager, financing prop 39, i think that's the only one that looks safe at this point. and up got to wonder, i mean, what is it they want? do they see a civic duty, do they see a political future for them? tom, they wonder what he's going to do. but jerry brown is a guy who has been vexed by the munger family. in this race. right? molly munger's prop 38 could be drawing support away from him and her brother charlie munger is financing the campaign apparently to kill his tax measure. >> belva: did one of them put more money in this week? >> the brother, charles, into this political action committee ca
. >> the office of civil rights in washington, d.c. told us they respond to complaints but no one is enforcing title 9 on a regular basis. of the more than 200 e-mails we sent a few principals did identify the coordinator about tut majority did not respond or i didn't know who it was. as a result of our investigation a national nonprofit group says they are taking action. we'll have those as they emerge here on nbc bay area. >> thank you. making a difference. thank you. if you have a tip fora, give us a call. send us e-mail to the unit at nbcbayarea.com. >> trick or treat from you tonight? >> it's no trick that there's rain on the radar, but a little bit of a treat, we're holding it off for the east and the south bay. pretty good transition. thanks for that. 57 in santa rosa now, it's cold on this evening. 62 in concord, 63 in almost and 63 in san jose. not only that but we're tracking this storm with some of the consistent and heavy rainfall. it's moving very slowly so this is good news for some of you, not others. picked up about .1 inch of rain. some of the heaviest rain on the 101 corridor
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be more clear. not only because president obama is right to most of them but bus he leads on all of them. i think he could have handleed politics and policies differently, but he has been decisive strong and consistent. important qualities in a president. his opponent is a self-described etch-a-sketch. the antithesis of leadership. i had no choice but to laugh when i hear people argue that mitt romney would be a better leader than president obama. that romney would better connect with the american people. middle class workers who deserve a fair wage and a promising job. students and their parents who not only strife for
unman e drones however some civil rights have privacy issueshey're hoping this small aircraft could help with other law-enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to it is attractive. >> to lower the amount of fuel in a helicopter which is $1,500 per hour for a helicopter however, these are only $2,200 per month to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drone... drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that and on the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. o
. thousands of attorneys representing two major presidential candidates civil rights groups are in place policied to challenge electoral results that may be called in question by machine failures, voter suppression or other allegation of illegal activity. that is a story also in "u.s.a. today" taking a look at what happened in 2000 in florida and saying that possibly another state could be like florida in battleaybe ohio or other ground states where you could have a recount and not know who the winner of the election is. also front page of the "wall street journal" medicare complicates the senior vote. senior citizens are a coveted bloc in florida where three make bum a quarter of the electr elee and they are important to romney given the deficit among young voters and minorities. he needs not only to win among seniors but win big. in 2008 john phmccain captured e group by 8% margin but lost to president barack obama. mr. romney is leading among the elderly by 6% to 12% a sign he may be weathering a charge by democrats that he and ryan with undermine medicare. that is the "wall street jo
-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
with opposing the war in chicago, very much part of our civil rights movement. chicago was the most segregated city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)

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